Slang maggie/brass maggie means

maggie/brass maggie means: a pound coin (£1) - apparently used in South Yorkshire UK - the story is that the slang was adopted during the extremely acrimonious and prolonged miners' strike of 1984 which coincided with the introduction of the pound coin. Margaret Thatcher acted firmly and ruthlessly in resisting the efforts of the miners and the unions to save the pit jobs and the British coalmining industry, reinforcing her reputation for exercising the full powers of the state, creating resentment among many. When the pound coin appeared it was immediately christened a 'Maggie', based seemingly on the notion that it was '...a brassy piece that thinks it's a sovereign..." (ack J Jamieson, Sep 2007) If you have more detail about where and when this slang arose and is used, please let me know. I am grateful to J Briggs for confirming (March 2008): "...I live in Penistone, South Yorks (what we call the West Riding) and it was certainly called a 'Brass Maggie' in my area. Typically in a derisive way, such as 'I wouldn't give you a brass maggie for that' for something overpriced but low value. It never really caught on and has died out now..."

What is the slang definition/meaning of maggie/brass maggie?

maggie/brass maggie means: a pound coin (£1) - apparently used in South Yorkshire UK - the story is that the slang was adopted during the extremely acrimonious and prolonged miners' strike of 1984 which coincided with the introduction of the pound coin. Margaret Thatcher acted firmly and ruthlessly in resisting the efforts of the miners and the unions to save the pit jobs and the British coalmining industry, reinforcing her reputation for exercising the full powers of the state, creating resentment among many. When the pound coin appeared it was immediately christened a 'Maggie', based seemingly on the notion that it was '...a brassy piece that thinks it's a sovereign..." (ack J Jamieson, Sep 2007) If you have more detail about where and when this slang arose and is used, please let me know. I am grateful to J Briggs for confirming (March 2008): "...I live in Penistone, South Yorks (what we call the West Riding) and it was certainly called a 'Brass Maggie' in my area. Typically in a derisive way, such as 'I wouldn't give you a brass maggie for that' for something overpriced but low value. It never really caught on and has died out now..."

Meaning of maggie/brass maggie slang

Slang: maggie/brass maggie means: a pound coin (£1) - apparently used in South Yorkshire UK - the story is that the slang was adopted during the extremely acrimonious and prolonged miners' strike of 1984 which coincided with the introduction of the pound coin. Margaret Thatcher acted firmly and ruthlessly in resisting the efforts of the miners and the unions to save the pit jobs and the British coalmining industry, reinforcing her reputation for exercising the full powers of the state, creating resentment among many. When the pound coin appeared it was immediately christened a 'Maggie', based seemingly on the notion that it was '...a brassy piece that thinks it's a sovereign..." (ack J Jamieson, Sep 2007) If you have more detail about where and when this slang arose and is used, please let me know. I am grateful to J Briggs for confirming (March 2008): "...I live in Penistone, South Yorks (what we call the West Riding) and it was certainly called a 'Brass Maggie' in my area. Typically in a derisive way, such as 'I wouldn't give you a brass maggie for that' for something overpriced but low value. It never really caught on and has died out now..."

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Slangs, sentences and phrases like maggie/brass maggie

Meaning of maggie/brass maggie

maggie/brass maggie means: a pound coin (£1) - apparently used in South Yorkshire UK - the story is that the slang was adopted during the extremely acrimonious and prolonged miners' strike of 1984 which coincided with the introduction of the pound coin. Margaret Thatcher acted firmly and ruthlessly in resisting the efforts of the miners and the unions to save the pit jobs and the British coalmining industry, reinforcing her reputation for exercising the full powers of the state, creating resentment among many. When the pound coin appeared it was immediately christened a 'Maggie', based seemingly on the notion that it was '...a brassy piece that thinks it's a sovereign..." (ack J Jamieson, Sep 2007) If you have more detail about where and when this slang arose and is used, please let me know. I am grateful to J Briggs for confirming (March 2008): "...I live in Penistone, South Yorks (what we call the West Riding) and it was certainly called a 'Brass Maggie' in my area. Typically in a derisive way, such as 'I wouldn't give you a brass maggie for that' for something overpriced but low value. It never really caught on and has died out now..."

Meaning of out to lunch

out to lunch means: Having no idea what is going on. Maggie's gown for the prom is out of this world.

Meaning of Maggie (the)

Maggie (the) means: HMCS MAGNIFICENT, and aircraft carrier that served in the Canadian navy in the post-war era.

Meaning of out of this world

out of this world means: Excellent, outstanding. Maggie's gown for the prom is out of this world.

Meaning of sir-keith

sir-keith means: Pronounced as a long, drawn out, low-voiced suuuur... followed by short, high pitched Keeith!). A general, all purpose insult, mostly used when passing friends in the halls . Doubt anyone but me and a few select others remember this - probably never made it outside my peer group, let alone my school. I have no idea where it came from, or what it actually means. (ed: I wonder if it had something to do with Sir Keith Joseph - he who introduced the GCSE - one time education minister under Maggie Thatcher??)

Meaning of cow juice

cow juice means: Milk. given away free in schools in the UK until Mrs Thatcher became Minister of Education. Produced the 'rhyme' "Maggie Thatcher, milk snatcher, "Thatcher Snatcher Baby Basher". "Thatcher Snatcher" has stayed as her nickname ever since.

Meaning of brass

brass means: money. From the 16th century, and a popular expression the north of England, e.g., 'where there's muck there's brass' which incidentally alluded to certain trades involving scrap, mess or waste which offered high earnings. This was also a defensive or retaliatory remark aimed at those of middle, higher or profesional classes who might look down on certain 'working class' entrepreneurs or traders. The 'where there's much there's brass' expression helped maintain and spread the populairity iof the 'brass' money slang, rather than cause it. Brass originated as slang for money by association to the colour of gold coins, and the value of brass as a scrap metal.

Meaning of BRASS

BRASS means: Brass (shortened from brass nail) is slang for a prostitute. Brass is British slang for money.Brass is British slang for penniless.

Meaning of BRASS COLLAR or BRASS HAT

BRASS COLLAR or BRASS HAT means: Railroad official. Term may have originated from gold-braided collar of conductor's uniform and brass plate on his cap

Meaning of brass monkeys

brass monkeys means: Adj. Of the weather or air temperature, very cold. E.g."Wear a hat and scarf, it's brass monkeys out there." See 'brass monkey weather'.

Meaning of brass monkey weather

brass monkey weather means: Noun. Very cold weather. From the phrase, 'cold enough to freeze the balls off a brass monkey'. Cf. 'brassy' and 'brass monkeys'.

Meaning of BRASS HAT

BRASS HAT means: Brass hat is British slang for a senior officer in the armed forces or police.

Meaning of BRASS

BRASS means: A babbitt-lined blank of bronze that forms the bearing upon which the car rests. To brass a car is to replace one of those bearings

Meaning of brass-neck

brass-neck means: Noun. Impudence, cheek, nerve. Also brass-necked (adj). [Orig. Northern dialect]

Meaning of brass

brass means: High ranking officials. When the brass hears about this, they aren't going to like it.

Slang definitions, words, phrases and meanings

Meaning of OLD IRON AND BRASS

OLD IRON AND BRASS means: Old iron and brass is London Cockney rhyming slang for grass. Old iron and brass is British military rhyming slang for a pass.

Meaning of VETTE

VETTE means: Vette is American slang for a Chevrolet Corvette sports car.

Meaning of A Canadian

A Canadian means: Used when ordering a certain type of beer "Molson Canadian" EX: "Gimme a Canadian bartender!"

Meaning of bust a grape

bust a grape means: v. The popping of one’s testicle.  "Dang, that fool just bust a grape, that’s why I don’t mess with that X-Game sh*t!" 

Meaning of federal

federal means: against the law, or not right.  "Yo, I ain't stealing that money, that's federal!" 

Meaning of COOK (UP)

COOK (UP) means: prepare for an injection

Meaning of butter fingered

butter fingered means: slippery hands and/or fingers

Meaning of knob

knob means: a prominent rounded hill, sometimes call a knap

Meaning of St. Peter's Needle

St. Peter's Needle means:   Severe discipline

Meaning of GUYSIZ

Meaning of EYNGIRU

Meaning of LUYCHOAS

Meaning of AUSTYANGY

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